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Rainey Street Band: Brighouse Band of the Year 2014

OK, I only started blogging back in March and some of what I write is very much first time around. Whether this becomes a regular feature I don't know. But...some of my friends have delivered some fantastic music which is continually evolving and which has made Sunday teatimes at either The Beck or at The Cock of The North one of my favourite times of the week and in my view they need to be applauded.

The Rainey Street Band have consistently been entertaining us over the year with their mix of Americana and Bluegrass, with songs from the likes of Simone Felice and The Old Crow Medicine Show. Rainey Street is in Austin, Texas, where a couple of years ago band founder, Dave Kennedy and his mate, and now fellow band member, Tom Firth, headed for a holiday and to pick up on what was happening in the burgeoning local music scene over there. 

Dave had originally played solo, then linked up with ace local harmonica player Ian Crabtree, who has been playing with local legends Blood, Sweat and Beers for years, which then added another dimension. From there on, others have joined - Dave Richmond on bass and Andy Garbett, maestro on the cajon - plus guest contributors like Fletch - and they have just got better.

What I like is that the guys have a core range of great songs which keep evolving. Different versions, added instruments - Tom unveiled a new accordian tonight - mean that every gig is different to the last. They have played away from Brighouse - as far away as Darlington and last week Sowerby Bridge - and they do deserve a wider audience.They also have an eagerly-awaited CD coming out shortly via Jim Ker's Blue Milk Music.

I would challenge anyone to not enjoy listening to the Rainey Street Band. Great music, ideal accompaniment to a good pint or two, lovely guys...and for me, consistently the best live music I've seen in 2014. So, ladies and gentlemen, I give you the Real Ale, Real Music Local Band of the Year for 2014...The Rainey Street Band....


The Rainey Street Band


Comments

  1. Surreal. Like looking in a mirror. This is me!
    Good stuff Chris. Tons of interest. Enjoyed the Manchester pubs piece. I know and love a few of the pubs there, especially the Marble Arch.
    You don't mention walking, as an interest, but I'm sure it'll be in the mix somewhere.
    Thanks for the intro to The Rainey Street Band. Sounds like my kind of thing. So much so that I might well find my way down to the Miller's on Friday. See you there!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks for the kind comments! I do like walking - guess what, there are a couple of blogs based around it - but so long since I wrote the profile that I can't remember what I put in!

      Delete

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