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Star Attraction

One of my favourite pubs in Huddersfield is The Star, at the bottom of Chapel Hill, at Folly Hall, on the way to Lockwood.

Very much a local's pub, with a loyal band of regulars, it hosts a beer festival 3 times a year, where you can come across a lot of new beers for the first time.

Yesterday was the Summer Festival, I called in with my mate Harry, and Dave and Joanne who we'd bumped into at the nearby Rat and Ratchet and who accepted our invitation to venture down the road.

Most of the beer is out the back, in what is basically a permanent marquee, with a bank of hand pumps as far as the eye can see. Dave and Joanne seemed to enjoy themselves, although Joanne - not a real ale drinker - had to resort to the main bar for a pint of lager in the end!

What I like about The Star is that it just shuffles along to its own beat. Always closed on a Monday, it has carried on quietly for years in its own world. Whilst always featuring beers from the very local Mallinsons brewery, it has had Brewer's Gold from Rochdale-based Pictish as a permanent beer for years, probably the only pub in the area to do so. And the choice of beers never shows the signs of some big company's list, with small breweries from across the UK featuring on a regular basis. It is very much a place based around conversation where the bar and the beers are the focus.

Sam has been landlady for around 15 years, with loyal support from a small group of staff who have likewise been there for years. And the beer festivals - normally 3 a year -  are always an opportunity to sample something different and to catch up with old faces, and I can heartily recommend a visit.

Yesterday's was very enjoyable - numbers perhaps down due to the Huddersfield Carnival in the town centre and a festival at the Monkey Club in Armitage Bridge - but I am already looking forward to the next one....







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